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Comments Off on Gila Trout and Smallmouth Bass Fly Fishing…

How about some fly fishing for Gila Trout and Smallmouth Bass. Click the image to watch the video.

 

 

More YEP Winners…

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This is great to see…  I love it when kids make the most out of great tags…

J-

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My Sons name is Christopher he is 12 years old, got his first chance at a Bull this last year in the Valle Vidal….bagged a nice 6X6 bull opening morning

My daughter name is Miranda she is 10 years old, loves to play basketball and be in the outdoors ,she also had her first chance at a bull this past year in the Valle Vidal…she also bagged a nice 7×7 bull opening morning …

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Another YEP Winner

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This is what it is all about… Great Job Emma, we are super proud of you…

J-

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I’d like to nominate my daughter – Emma Moore; she is 11 years old. She has been at my side fishing for trout but has often mentioned how she would really like to hunt. In February 2013, she took her hunter safety course and passed. On the way home, I asked her if she would like me to enter her into the draw. Instantly, her reply was, “yes!” I asked what she wanted to hunt. She replied elk with a bow. I told her that she was probably not big enough to kill an elk with a bow yet. She was disappointed. I asked her if there was anything else she wanted to hunt. She replied with put me in for everything.

Between the time of putting in for the draw and getting the results, we hunted turkey with our friends Carl and Robin (his daughter) Abrams. We got skunked. However, Emma got her own 20 gauge over/under so now, she is prepared for bird hunting.

When the draw was released, we were excited that Emma drew a once in a lifetime Oryx tag on the WSMR. She practiced all summer long with a Remington 700 Mountain Rifle, which I had customized for her length of pull. She went from shooting a reduced recoil load to the hottest load that I could find – Winchester 180 grain XP3. She not only handled the load well, but she also maintained her accuracy.

We joined Robin (her friend) on her antelope hunt and watched her take an antelope. This only fueled Emma’s fire for hunting. We went to WSMR in late September for her hunt. We hunted hard Friday (after the safety brief), Saturday, and Sunday. We jumped oryx and spotted and stalked oryx for 3 long days. That was one of the harder hunts that we have had on WSMR (Stallion). On Saturday, we spotted 4 oryx about 1.5 miles out. We decided to go after them. We stalked to within 40 yards of them. They were bedded in the brush. Turns out, there were 6 of them. We sat there for about 5 minutes quietly picking them through the brush and trying to show the children (Robin, Carl’s daughter was with us) where they were. I told Emma to pick one out, and when they stood, she would only have a second or so to shoot. Well, they stood, and Emma was so excited that the gun never barked once. Instead, I could see that Emma was almost shaking because she was so excited.

That night she told me that she blew it and was worried that she would not be able to get one. I was beginning to doubt myself about putting her in for a once in a lifetime tag. I told her that we would do our best the next day, but she needed to be prepared because you could go overs and days hunting, but sometimes you only have a second or so opportunity to pull it off. The next day, we went out again, and got into some Oryx. They were about 110 yards off, and the they spotted us and took off. Emma and I chased after them after they hit a hill. I was in the lead with her following me. When we were running towards them, a doe popped up out of no where and shocked both of us. The oryx were gone at that point, but we gave it a try.

We decided to go down to the southern part of Stallion around lunch time. The kids were getting hungry, and Carl and I decided to make some dehydrated food for them while we glassed for oryx. All of sudden, Carl pulled me to the side exclaiming that there were 3 typical horned oryx running our way. I pulled Emma out of the truck and got her set up in a prone position. They were at 220 yards – a stretch for her, but still doable. They came within range and were still running. Carl honked the truck horn, and they stopped. Still, the Remington did not bark. Emma was frustrated, and said that she had no shot (she was on an elevated position trying to shoot down from a prone position…for an adult, this was doable but not for an 11 year old). We hopped into the truck and sped down the road. The oryx were still running. We got about a mile ahead of them. Emma and I bailed out of the truck and ran about 300 yards out into the desert. We looked and looked but could not located them. I looked behind us thinking what in the heck…where did they go? Then, I spotted them running straight at us. I turned Emma around and pointed to them. I ranged them at 110 yards and told her that they were still running towards us. I told her to pick out any one of them that she wanted. She did. They stopped at 65 yards, and she shot at the lead cow. The cow oryx was quartering to us, and Emma hit that oryx hard. The oryx side stepped about 10 feet after the shot while I was telling (maybe even yelling???) shoot it again, shoot it again. Emma was so excited that she ejected the shell but jammed it when she put the bolt forward. She handed me the rifle, and I cleared the jam and gave her the rifle right when the oryx fell. I cannot explain to anyone the way I felt knowing that my 11 year old daughter just killed a typical oryx on a once in a lifetime hunt.

The cow was not huge – it was 31″, but when we got to the gate, we were told that we were one of the lucky ones. Out of the 65 (or so) tags for the hunt, there were only about half of the hunters who were successful with only half of those being able to take a typical. We were told that the cold winter from 3 years ago had hit the oryx herd hard, and that many of the survivors only had 1 horn due to the extreme cold temperatures. They told us that her oryx was definitely considered a trophy. Regardless of what they had told us, this oryx was a true trophy. This oryx also cemented the fact that now she wants to hunt regardless of being successful or anything else.

We went out to hunt cow elk with a muzzleloader (again, having one of mine customized for her). Again, we had no success, but she did get a muzzleloader out of it. To boot, she got a Diamond Infinity Edge bow for Christmas. She now has her own 20 gauge shotgun, a 30-06 rifle, a Knight .50 muzzleloader, and a bow. She is now all set for future hunts!!!

I do not have the ability to upload photos for her along with this nomination, but if you want some, please get me your email address, and I will submit some. Thanks.

Jason Moore

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Brock and I go fishing

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Here is a quick video on a recent trip Brock and I took to a local pond…

Gila River Diversion Interview.. KSFR

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All…

This is an edited interview I did with KSFR.com regarding the Gila River Diversion Proposal.

Thanks for listening

J-

 

Draining of Lake Roberts

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This should be a good thing..

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New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
Media contact: Dan Williams, (505) 476-8004
Public contact: (505) 476-8000
dan.williams@state.nm.us
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, JULY 30, 2013:
Lake Roberts dam improvement project to begin soon
SILVER CITY – A project to improve the dam and spillway at Lake Roberts, a popular fishing and camping destination in southwestern New Mexico, is scheduled to begin this week as the Department of Game and Fish starts to lower the water level about 10 feet.

The lake and the Gila National Forest campgrounds and picnic area will remain open during the construction, estimated to take about one year. Fishing opportunities and access to the shoreline may be limited, and the boat ramp will be closed as the water level drops over the next month. The portion of the lake around the dam and spillway will be closed for the duration of the project.

The Department of Game and Fish will monitor fish health during the project to determine whether to relax fishing bag limits to avoid fish going to waste. Once the project is finished, the lake will be refilled and restocked with fish.

The $6.5 million project is designed to make the dam and spillway better able to withstand extreme flooding events. The plan is to replace the existing spillway, construct a secondary 70-feet-wide spillway, and raise the dam eight feet. Sportsmen are paying for the project through license fees and federal excise taxes on fishing equipment and boat fuel.

Mike Gustin, assistant chief of lands for the Department of Game and Fish, said the state engineer has indicated that the dam could be vulnerable if a major flood were to come down Sapillo Creek. Since the dam was completed in 1963, a small town has taken roots along the tailwaters. The improvements will help the dam withstand a major flood.

The dam at Lake Roberts is one of 11 dams owned and maintained by the State Game Commission and the Department of Game and Fish. The others are Eagle Nest, Bear Canyon, Jackson, McGaffey, Laguna del Campo, Fenton, Hopewell, Snow, Quemado and Clayton lakes. All are scheduled for different degrees of upgrades over the next four years.

For more information about the Gila National Forest recreation sites at Lake Roberts, please contact Wilderness District Ranger Ray Torres at (575) 536-2250.

Comments Off on Bass Fishing in Bill Evans and Trail Cam Pics

How about a little FF for Largemouth Bass in Bill Evans and some trail cam pics??

Comments Off on Gila River Smallies on a Fly Rod.. GOOD TIMES..

WOW… What a great trip…  Follow me on a Fly Fishing Smallie Trip in the Gila… I also come across a bunch of elk..

 

Brock’s First Fish!!!

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Great Job Brock.. We are proud of you..

Comments Off on Rio Grande Del Norte National Monumnet

This is good stuff…

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POSTED: 12:05 am SANTA FE — New Mexico is about to get a new national monument. Rio Grande del Norte, whose 240,000 acres encompass portions of the spectacular Rio Grande Gorge and Ute Mountain, will receive that designation with a proclamation scheduled to be signed by President Barack Obama on Monday, according to a White House official. Obama will make the designation under the federal Antiquities Act. This action will bypass Congress, which has failed to support efforts by the state’s congressional delegation since at least 2009 to further protect this area of Taos and Rio Arriba counties. The land has been managed by the Bureau of Land Management, which will continue to do so under the new designation, according to the White House official. The news drew applause from New Mexico’s senators and Rep. Ben Ray Luján, whose district covers that area. “I’m excited about it,” said Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., in a telephone interview. “That area has always been really special to me.” The designation “gives an overlay of protection to make sure that the viewsheds are not developed,” he said. “The idea is not to turn it into a Disneyland, but to protect it in the kind of undeveloped splendor that has always drawn people…” The lawmakers roundly praised former Sen. Jeff Bingaman, who first started working on the project in 2007. “Protecting the Río Grande del Norte means we are not only preserving this beautiful space, but ensuring that it will continue to be used by anglers, ranchers, and land grant heirs,” Bingaman said in a news release, adding his thanks to the Obama administration. “It is my hope that this decision has a very positive impact on the economy of the region.” Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., said, “This is a victory for the people of Taos and Rio Arriba counties and will be a lasting part of Jeff’s legacy. I am proud to have been a part of such a successful effort to protect some of northern New Mexico’s most historically and culturally rich land for the benefit of locals and visitors.” Luján echoed the praise for Bingaman’s work, and said, “By working together with small businesses, local governments, Taos Pueblo and those who appreciate this pristine land for recreation, traditional and cultural uses, or finding inspiration—we have finally ensured that the history and future of the Río Grande del Norte will be protected and preserved.” Outgoing Interior Secretary Ken Salazar visited the area in December to hear from local residents, most of whom spoke in favor of the national monument. The northern New Mexico designation has received widespread local support, with Taos Pueblo, Taos city and county governments, various conservation organizations, as well as individual businesses and the Taos and Mora Valley chambers of commerce backing the plan. A study by BBC Research & Consulting has estimated that making Rio Grande del Norte a national monument would create $15 million in new revenue annually and create 279 new jobs thanks to an increase in visitation to Taos and Rio Arriba counties, according to the New Mexico Wildlife Federation. Stretching from a deep part of the gorge west of Taos all the way to the Colorado border, the soon-to-be monument includes petroglyphs, archaeological sites, habitat for birds and other wildlife, and cultural resources stretching from ancient inhabitants to later Spanish settlers. Obama also is slated to create other national monuments in a signing ceremony on Monday: First State National Monument in Delaware; Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument in Maryland; Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument in Ohio, and San Juan Islands National Monument in Washington State. Rio Grande del Norte will be the first new national monument created in New Mexico since President Bill Clinton gave that designation to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument near Cochiti in 2001. — This article appeared on page C1 of the Albuquerque Journal