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Another YEP Winner

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This is what it is all about… Great Job Emma, we are super proud of you…

J-

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I’d like to nominate my daughter – Emma Moore; she is 11 years old. She has been at my side fishing for trout but has often mentioned how she would really like to hunt. In February 2013, she took her hunter safety course and passed. On the way home, I asked her if she would like me to enter her into the draw. Instantly, her reply was, “yes!” I asked what she wanted to hunt. She replied elk with a bow. I told her that she was probably not big enough to kill an elk with a bow yet. She was disappointed. I asked her if there was anything else she wanted to hunt. She replied with put me in for everything.

Between the time of putting in for the draw and getting the results, we hunted turkey with our friends Carl and Robin (his daughter) Abrams. We got skunked. However, Emma got her own 20 gauge over/under so now, she is prepared for bird hunting.

When the draw was released, we were excited that Emma drew a once in a lifetime Oryx tag on the WSMR. She practiced all summer long with a Remington 700 Mountain Rifle, which I had customized for her length of pull. She went from shooting a reduced recoil load to the hottest load that I could find – Winchester 180 grain XP3. She not only handled the load well, but she also maintained her accuracy.

We joined Robin (her friend) on her antelope hunt and watched her take an antelope. This only fueled Emma’s fire for hunting. We went to WSMR in late September for her hunt. We hunted hard Friday (after the safety brief), Saturday, and Sunday. We jumped oryx and spotted and stalked oryx for 3 long days. That was one of the harder hunts that we have had on WSMR (Stallion). On Saturday, we spotted 4 oryx about 1.5 miles out. We decided to go after them. We stalked to within 40 yards of them. They were bedded in the brush. Turns out, there were 6 of them. We sat there for about 5 minutes quietly picking them through the brush and trying to show the children (Robin, Carl’s daughter was with us) where they were. I told Emma to pick one out, and when they stood, she would only have a second or so to shoot. Well, they stood, and Emma was so excited that the gun never barked once. Instead, I could see that Emma was almost shaking because she was so excited.

That night she told me that she blew it and was worried that she would not be able to get one. I was beginning to doubt myself about putting her in for a once in a lifetime tag. I told her that we would do our best the next day, but she needed to be prepared because you could go overs and days hunting, but sometimes you only have a second or so opportunity to pull it off. The next day, we went out again, and got into some Oryx. They were about 110 yards off, and the they spotted us and took off. Emma and I chased after them after they hit a hill. I was in the lead with her following me. When we were running towards them, a doe popped up out of no where and shocked both of us. The oryx were gone at that point, but we gave it a try.

We decided to go down to the southern part of Stallion around lunch time. The kids were getting hungry, and Carl and I decided to make some dehydrated food for them while we glassed for oryx. All of sudden, Carl pulled me to the side exclaiming that there were 3 typical horned oryx running our way. I pulled Emma out of the truck and got her set up in a prone position. They were at 220 yards – a stretch for her, but still doable. They came within range and were still running. Carl honked the truck horn, and they stopped. Still, the Remington did not bark. Emma was frustrated, and said that she had no shot (she was on an elevated position trying to shoot down from a prone position…for an adult, this was doable but not for an 11 year old). We hopped into the truck and sped down the road. The oryx were still running. We got about a mile ahead of them. Emma and I bailed out of the truck and ran about 300 yards out into the desert. We looked and looked but could not located them. I looked behind us thinking what in the heck…where did they go? Then, I spotted them running straight at us. I turned Emma around and pointed to them. I ranged them at 110 yards and told her that they were still running towards us. I told her to pick out any one of them that she wanted. She did. They stopped at 65 yards, and she shot at the lead cow. The cow oryx was quartering to us, and Emma hit that oryx hard. The oryx side stepped about 10 feet after the shot while I was telling (maybe even yelling???) shoot it again, shoot it again. Emma was so excited that she ejected the shell but jammed it when she put the bolt forward. She handed me the rifle, and I cleared the jam and gave her the rifle right when the oryx fell. I cannot explain to anyone the way I felt knowing that my 11 year old daughter just killed a typical oryx on a once in a lifetime hunt.

The cow was not huge – it was 31″, but when we got to the gate, we were told that we were one of the lucky ones. Out of the 65 (or so) tags for the hunt, there were only about half of the hunters who were successful with only half of those being able to take a typical. We were told that the cold winter from 3 years ago had hit the oryx herd hard, and that many of the survivors only had 1 horn due to the extreme cold temperatures. They told us that her oryx was definitely considered a trophy. Regardless of what they had told us, this oryx was a true trophy. This oryx also cemented the fact that now she wants to hunt regardless of being successful or anything else.

We went out to hunt cow elk with a muzzleloader (again, having one of mine customized for her). Again, we had no success, but she did get a muzzleloader out of it. To boot, she got a Diamond Infinity Edge bow for Christmas. She now has her own 20 gauge shotgun, a 30-06 rifle, a Knight .50 muzzleloader, and a bow. She is now all set for future hunts!!!

I do not have the ability to upload photos for her along with this nomination, but if you want some, please get me your email address, and I will submit some. Thanks.

Jason Moore

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2008 Archery Coues Deer Hunt

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I am starting to migrate a lot of stuff from my previous blog… 

Good Things to Good People

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1/18/08 What a Way to Start the New Year!!

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As I created the waypoint for the kill site on my GPS the big number that stood out was 350, that was what my trip odometer read. This year I covered 350 miles of some of the best Coues deer country in the southwest looking for the perfect setup. The Burro Mountains have always had some quality deer hunting and like most well known hunting areas the “usual” spots had treestands on every saddle or game-trail. My goal was to find a nice honey hole off of what we call “the Big Three”, The Big Three consist of Jacks Peak, Burro Mountain and Ferguson Mountain. Throughout the summer I had at least two trail cameras in the field at all times. For the most part they were over springs or game trails, I had decent success and I had several great pictures of some quality bucks. I also found a real nice set of shed that were a little big that 100 inches.

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Unfortunately, as December rolled around everything went south. All of my bucks stopped showing up, I still don’t know what happened but it was pretty obvious I was going to need to spend some time locating does or I was going to be in for a long tough hunt. I was pretty much in panic mode. Coues deer hunting is a game of preparation. Unlike Mule deer hunting you need to do your homework upfront. I changed my strategy from worrying about the bucks and I spent a ton of time behind the 15×56 Swarovski’s looking for does. I knew that once the rut kicked in the bucks would be chasing. A few days before the hunt I found three nice groups of does and I knew that I was back in the game. I also found some scrapes and rubs in the general area.
My initial plan was to switch between a spring that the does were hitting and a scrape line. If I wasn’t getting into deer I would change areas and hunt a huge flat in a saddle that I had a feeling was going to have a scrape line in it.
As the hunt started I was hunting with a heavy heart, my dad has been sick and in and out of the hospital.  Even though I had planned all year for this hunt it was just hard to leave the house in the morning.
The first couple of the days were extremely windy and the deer were not moving. Trying to make something happened I decided to do some Spot-n-Stalk hunting. I wasn’t able to get on any Coues deer but I was able to get within 30 yards of this Mule deer.

I was able to get these Mule deer pictures during some of my time on one of my stands. I also had a few bigger deer, some Javelina and a coyote come in but I wasn’t able to get pictures of them, these bucks are nothing special but at least I knew I wasn’t getting winded.

 

 

Unfortunately, because of the high winds and sleet the Coues deer just weren’t moving. I have always said,” Mule deer see a person and they think he is a stump, Coues deer see a stump and think it is a person”. When the winds are high the deer are just to scared to move.
As the hunt wore on it became obvious that I need to make something happen, so I moved to a scrape line. Below are some pictures of the scrapes and some rubs that I have found in the area. Scrapes during this time of year are a much better indicator of a buck working the area but it is nice to see the rubs.

 

This is the little patch of trees that I setup in. I ALMOST CLOSED THE DEAL on this scrape line but a buck came from the one area that I couldn’t get a shot. He came from behind me and I think he caught a whiff of me in the swirling winds. Needless to say I was pretty disappointed.

A few days into the hunt my dad was getting stronger and he was released from the hospita   on Tuesday giving me one good day to hunt before I had to pack for my Mexico Coues deer hunt. So I figured I needed to push the issue. I hiked into the flat that I had scouted earlier in the season. During the summer months I had seen three different bucks in the area and I found a few sheds.

As I made the .75 mile hike into the flat I found a few rubs and scrapes. My hunch had been correct. After slowing working thru the area I decided to sit the scrape line and rub below.

 

I have found that for me, the best way to hunt a scrape line is to stay mobile and sit around 35 yards off the scrape. I also carry one of those little stools to sit on for comfort. I had just setup my stool and hung my bow on a bow hanger in the tree when I first caught movement. I hadn’t even knocked and arrow. First it was a flicker of an ear then I was able to pick out a brow-tine. After 6 months of scouting and one day of hunting left it looked like if I could knock and arrow and draw I might have the opportunity at a nice buck. I wasn’t able to determine the number of points but at this point it didn’t matter. If I had the chance to take him I was going to let the air out of him.
I had setup so if a buck came in I would be in his blind spot for a few yards. This would give me the opportunity to grab my bow and knock an arrow. Luck was with me this day. As he went into the blind spot I pulled “Yoda II” (my arrow) from the quiver, knocked him, drew and got ready to pick a spot. I always have a cheesy saying that I say to myself, it is “Confidence is Deadly”. It just reminds me that I have done everything in my power to make the shot. I have the best bow, the best arrow, the best broadhead and I have practiced to to make the shot. As I mutter those words in my mind, he cleared the brush at 30 yards, I picked a spot and I released the arrow. As the arrow flew I knew it was a good shot, it took out both lungs. I don’t think he knew what happened. He jumped a little and trotted off to about 60 yards. I am a firm believe of shoot until they are down so I pulled “Yoda III” knocked, drew and picked a spot again. I hit him high and “spined” him. He dropped.
This was my setup, he came in from the left.

This is the “as they lay picture”.

It is very hard to explain the emotions that come over you when you kill an animal that you have spent so much time admiring. I must admit that I did my little dance and I did a bunch of screaming and yelling but after that I just sat there and admired him in all of his beauty. I always give thanks and remind myself that it is not about the kill but about setting a goal and reaching it. My Grandfather Papo used to say that the outdoors was his church, nothing could be truer.

 

Stay tuned…. I need to tell you about my Mexico Rifle Hunt… You won’t believe what I killed. A true GIANT…..

2013 NM Rifle Antelope Hunt

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Hey Everyone… Here is the video for my 2013 Rifle Antelope Hunt…

Good times… Thanks for watching..

 

Comments Off on Nice Set of Mulie Sheds, Trail Cam Pics and Old Dudes!

How about some shed hunting, trail cam pics and a cool old dude camp?

 

 

B’s Camo Cricket

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A few weeks ago Candace and I took Brock shooting. It went pretty well and he had a great time but we ran across a few issues

1) He was using a gun that was WAY to big for him

2) With the Marlin he was shooting it was hard to get him to “reset” once he fired his first shot.  In other words, with that little semi-auto he just went nuts and started spraying bullets.  Partially my fault.

3) We wanted for B to have a little gun of his own

4) We also wanted him to learn correct form

5) AND to be honest I was looking for a project

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That being said we put the word out on the street that we were in the market for a youth .22.  We went to the usual places and found a few but we figured that SOMEONE had to have one that they had outgrown… The good news is that some old dude at the range had one and sold it to us for $20.00. He really helped us out, I guess he looked at me and figured I was going to be the old dude hanging out at the range some day so he had pity on us.

Below is what the gun started liked and the progression from boring black to digital camo.

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I made a small paint booth out of an old box, it seems to work pretty well

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The key is to make sure that you don’t spray on the paint to heavily… TAKE YOUR TIME… Multiple coats are better than runny paint

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This is what B’s Cricket looks like… Pretty neat.

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This was a fun little project.  What lessons did I learn?

1) BUY STENCILS – We made our own and it was a pain in the butt.  It is well worth the $10 that you can get them for online.

2)Google Youtube – There are a ton of tips on painting your gun.

3) Just have fun, you can always paint it again.

 

Comments Off on Trail Cam Pics(JORDAN IS BACK) and Mountain House Low-Sodium Meals

JORDAN IS BACK!!! Man I need to find him.

Reloading Bug!!!

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Over the last few months I have been helping Candace work on shooting her muzzle-loader, part of that work included shooting our .223.  I just wanted her to get use to the the process of firing a gun and getting familiar with things.   At the time I had a quite a bit of Ammo that was Ready to Roll but I had even more brass sitting around that needed to be clean up, re-sized, primed, grained and loaded. To be honest I wasn’t sure if that brass was ever going to get the attention that it deserved, so it just sat in a bucket.   After the season, Candace and I realized that we had a pretty good time just going to the range and shooting a little, so a couple of nights ago Brock and I started working on getting that old brass load.  I am not sure he really understands what we are doing or the process but he is pretty good at little tasks… I think he is pretty good at this type of detail stuff because of all the lego’s he plays with…  Anyway, it is the same basic concept.

Here he is helping me get the media out of the brass….

Little Guys… Some Ready, Some in Staging..

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How about some Elk Scouting and Bears on Video?

NM Fishing Report Dec 13th….

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, DEC. 13, 2011:

 

NEW MEXICO FISHING REPORT

 

This fishing report, provided by the Department of Game and Fish, has been generated from the best information available from area officers, anglers, guides and local businesses. Conditions may vary as stream, lake and weather conditions alter fish and angler activities.

 

Northwest

 

Animas RiverThe flow is 240 cfs. No report due to weather.

Chama River – No read on flow due to ice on the upper stretches. Below El Vado Lake, the flow is 382 cfs and the flow below Abiquiu Lake is 388 cfs. The Chama below El Vado Dam has the most consistent good fishing on the Chama. The stretch downstream of the village of Chama into El Vado reservoir is slowing down. The release out of El Vado is murky but fishable.The stretch below Abiquiu Dam is fishing good and the water clarity is getting better.

San Juan RiverUpper section – Catch and Release flow is 493 cfs.The habitat improvements and silt remediation project on the San Juan was completed last week. The work in “The Braids,” has been very productive as fish have moved into this new habitat where they previously weren’t. Good midge fishing and midge hatches during the mornings and good blue winged olive hatches in the afternoons. In the mornings, use a red midge larva as your point fly and trail a size 24-26 black or gray midge pupa. As the afternoon progresses, change your flies to baetis, such as a gray or chocolate RS2 or foam wing emerger.

Abiquiu Lake – Fishing is slow for all species.

El Vado Lake – No report due to weather and a lack of anglers. Ice is forming around the edges of the lake.

Heron LakeNo report due to weather and a lack of anglers. Ice is forming around the edges of the lake.

Jackson Lake Trout fishing is reported as fair using Power Bait, salmon eggs and worms from shore.

Lake FarmingtonTrout fishing is reported as fair using Power Bait, salmon eggs and worms. Best success is reported close to the dam.

Morgan Lake – No report

Navajo Lake – Trout fishing is reported as fair to good from the dam using spinners and streamers.

 

Northeast

 

Cimarron River – No read on flows due to ice. The Cimarron is done until spring.

Costilla Creek – The flow is 61 cfs near the town of Costilla. Fishing is reported as slow below the Valle Vidal boundary, water levels are very low and there is snow and ice.

Red River – No read on flow due to ice at Questa and 38 cfs below the hatchery. Fishing for trout is reported as fair with better fishing on the lower stretches. Fish are being caught and all methods working. Please respect spawning fish and leave them alone while on their beds.

Rio Grande– No read on flow due to ice at Cerro. Flow is 446 cfs below the Taos Junction Bridge. Water levels are high and fishing is reported as slow to fair. Trout still seem to prefer the faster aerated water. Nymph the pocket water or strip streamers for the browns. Pike fishing is starting to get going. Best bet is to use large red and white lures or flies.

Rio Hondo – No read on flow due to ice. Trout fishing is reported as slow with snow and ice. Best bet is to fish at the confluence with the Rio Grande.

Rio Pueblo No read on flow due to ice. No report.

Charette Lakes – The lake has closed for the season and will reopen next spring.

Clayton Lake – The lake has closed for the season and will reopen next spring.

Eagle Nest Lake – The lake is closed to fishing until the ice is thick enough to allow it. The lake is also closed to boats for the winter. The New Mexico Game Commission will consider allowing unlimited take of northern pike from Eagle Nest Lake to address the aggressive species’ threat to the lake’s trout and salmon fishery at its meeting Thursday, Dec. 15, in Albuquerque.

Lake Alice and Lake Maloya – No report

Maxwell Lakes – The lake has closed for the season and will reopen next spring.

Shuree Ponds No report.

Springer Lakes – No report. Closed to ice fishing.

 

West-Central, including the Jemez Mountains

 

Jemez River, East Fork, Guadalupe and San AntonioFlow on the Jemez River is 20 cfs. The lower Guadalupe can be accessed below Gilman tunnels and is fishing fair in the warmer part of the day. The lower Jemez was stocked Nov. 11 and may be worth fishing for rainbows. The Valles Caldera National Preserve has closed the fishing program until next spring.

Metro DrainagesThe fishing is reported as fair with most methods catching fish. The drainages were stocked last week: Albuquerque with 300 triploid rainbow trout; Belen with 200; Bernalillo with 80; Corrales with 121; and Peralta with 250.

Bluewater Lake – Fishing for trout is reported as slow due to ice on the lake.

Cochiti Lake – No report. The lake is closed for the season along the Tetilla Peak side. The upper lake is also closed above Tetilla due to a log boom in place on the lake.

Fenton Lake – The lake has iced over and is closed to ice fishing because of dangerous ice conditions.

Tingley BeachTrout fishing has been good. Best reports are from anglers using salmon eggs and Pistol Petes. The ponds were stocked with 2,538 triploid rainbow trout. Reports from fly-rod anglers at the South/Catch and Release Pond have been hit and miss when using bunny leeches and black beetles.

 

East–Central, including the Pecos River

 

Coyote CreekClosed for the season.

Pecos River – No read on flow due to ice. The upper river is under ice, especially in shaded stretches. Fish the afternoon hours while the sun is on the water.

Conchas Lake – No report.

Morphy Lake – Closed for the season.

Santa Rosa Lake – No report.

Storrie Lake – Fishing is slow to fair for trout due to light traffic and cold weather.

Sumner Lake –Walleye are reported as fair. Fish are being caught in shallow water and off points and structure. The fish range from 14 to 20 inches and are hitting white shad lures. No reports for the trout stocked below the dam.

Ute Lake – No report.

 

Southwest

 

Gila River – The flow is 66 cfs and fishing is slow with the best success in the upper reaches of the river on the West, East and Middle forks.

Rio Grande– No report.

Bill Evans Lake – Fishing for trout is reported as fair with most methods working. The lake was stocked with 937 triploid rainbow trout last week.

Caballo Lake – Fishing is slow and water levels are very low. Best bet is below the spillway on the Rio Grande at Percha State Park.Fishermen are catching a few white bass and black bass on the river; most walleye are too small to keep (less than 14 inches.

Elephant Butte Lake – No report due to light traffic and weather. The Rio Grande between Elephant Butte and Caballo was stocked with 1,700 triploid rainbow trout.

Glenwood Ponds – Fishing is slow for trout. The ponds were stocked with 199 triploid rainbow trout.

Lake Roberts – Trout fishing is reported as slow with worms and Power Bait.

Quemado Lake – No report.

 

Southeast

 

Rio Ruidoso – Flow is 0.28 cfs in town and 6.6 cfs at Hollywood. Fishing is reported as slow on the lower stretches of the river where the flows are a bit higher.

Bonito Lake – Closed for the season.

Bottomless Lakes: No report.

Brantley Reservoir – There has been light pressure and no current report. A mandatory catch and release is in place at Brantley Lake because pesticides have been found in the fish. Do not keep or eat them.

Grindstone Reservoir – Fishing is fair for trout using worms, Power Bait and Pistol Petes. Best times to fish are reported from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Bear Harvest Limit Increase!!

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I think the Bear harvest limit has just been increased… i am looking to verification but look at this document…

Click Here

It is a PDF…

Jason