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How about some fly fishing for Gila Trout and Smallmouth Bass. Click the image to watch the video.

 

 

More YEP Winners…

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This is great to see…  I love it when kids make the most out of great tags…

J-

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My Sons name is Christopher he is 12 years old, got his first chance at a Bull this last year in the Valle Vidal….bagged a nice 6X6 bull opening morning

My daughter name is Miranda she is 10 years old, loves to play basketball and be in the outdoors ,she also had her first chance at a bull this past year in the Valle Vidal…she also bagged a nice 7×7 bull opening morning …

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Another YEP Winner

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This is what it is all about… Great Job Emma, we are super proud of you…

J-

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I’d like to nominate my daughter – Emma Moore; she is 11 years old. She has been at my side fishing for trout but has often mentioned how she would really like to hunt. In February 2013, she took her hunter safety course and passed. On the way home, I asked her if she would like me to enter her into the draw. Instantly, her reply was, “yes!” I asked what she wanted to hunt. She replied elk with a bow. I told her that she was probably not big enough to kill an elk with a bow yet. She was disappointed. I asked her if there was anything else she wanted to hunt. She replied with put me in for everything.

Between the time of putting in for the draw and getting the results, we hunted turkey with our friends Carl and Robin (his daughter) Abrams. We got skunked. However, Emma got her own 20 gauge over/under so now, she is prepared for bird hunting.

When the draw was released, we were excited that Emma drew a once in a lifetime Oryx tag on the WSMR. She practiced all summer long with a Remington 700 Mountain Rifle, which I had customized for her length of pull. She went from shooting a reduced recoil load to the hottest load that I could find – Winchester 180 grain XP3. She not only handled the load well, but she also maintained her accuracy.

We joined Robin (her friend) on her antelope hunt and watched her take an antelope. This only fueled Emma’s fire for hunting. We went to WSMR in late September for her hunt. We hunted hard Friday (after the safety brief), Saturday, and Sunday. We jumped oryx and spotted and stalked oryx for 3 long days. That was one of the harder hunts that we have had on WSMR (Stallion). On Saturday, we spotted 4 oryx about 1.5 miles out. We decided to go after them. We stalked to within 40 yards of them. They were bedded in the brush. Turns out, there were 6 of them. We sat there for about 5 minutes quietly picking them through the brush and trying to show the children (Robin, Carl’s daughter was with us) where they were. I told Emma to pick one out, and when they stood, she would only have a second or so to shoot. Well, they stood, and Emma was so excited that the gun never barked once. Instead, I could see that Emma was almost shaking because she was so excited.

That night she told me that she blew it and was worried that she would not be able to get one. I was beginning to doubt myself about putting her in for a once in a lifetime tag. I told her that we would do our best the next day, but she needed to be prepared because you could go overs and days hunting, but sometimes you only have a second or so opportunity to pull it off. The next day, we went out again, and got into some Oryx. They were about 110 yards off, and the they spotted us and took off. Emma and I chased after them after they hit a hill. I was in the lead with her following me. When we were running towards them, a doe popped up out of no where and shocked both of us. The oryx were gone at that point, but we gave it a try.

We decided to go down to the southern part of Stallion around lunch time. The kids were getting hungry, and Carl and I decided to make some dehydrated food for them while we glassed for oryx. All of sudden, Carl pulled me to the side exclaiming that there were 3 typical horned oryx running our way. I pulled Emma out of the truck and got her set up in a prone position. They were at 220 yards – a stretch for her, but still doable. They came within range and were still running. Carl honked the truck horn, and they stopped. Still, the Remington did not bark. Emma was frustrated, and said that she had no shot (she was on an elevated position trying to shoot down from a prone position…for an adult, this was doable but not for an 11 year old). We hopped into the truck and sped down the road. The oryx were still running. We got about a mile ahead of them. Emma and I bailed out of the truck and ran about 300 yards out into the desert. We looked and looked but could not located them. I looked behind us thinking what in the heck…where did they go? Then, I spotted them running straight at us. I turned Emma around and pointed to them. I ranged them at 110 yards and told her that they were still running towards us. I told her to pick out any one of them that she wanted. She did. They stopped at 65 yards, and she shot at the lead cow. The cow oryx was quartering to us, and Emma hit that oryx hard. The oryx side stepped about 10 feet after the shot while I was telling (maybe even yelling???) shoot it again, shoot it again. Emma was so excited that she ejected the shell but jammed it when she put the bolt forward. She handed me the rifle, and I cleared the jam and gave her the rifle right when the oryx fell. I cannot explain to anyone the way I felt knowing that my 11 year old daughter just killed a typical oryx on a once in a lifetime hunt.

The cow was not huge – it was 31″, but when we got to the gate, we were told that we were one of the lucky ones. Out of the 65 (or so) tags for the hunt, there were only about half of the hunters who were successful with only half of those being able to take a typical. We were told that the cold winter from 3 years ago had hit the oryx herd hard, and that many of the survivors only had 1 horn due to the extreme cold temperatures. They told us that her oryx was definitely considered a trophy. Regardless of what they had told us, this oryx was a true trophy. This oryx also cemented the fact that now she wants to hunt regardless of being successful or anything else.

We went out to hunt cow elk with a muzzleloader (again, having one of mine customized for her). Again, we had no success, but she did get a muzzleloader out of it. To boot, she got a Diamond Infinity Edge bow for Christmas. She now has her own 20 gauge shotgun, a 30-06 rifle, a Knight .50 muzzleloader, and a bow. She is now all set for future hunts!!!

I do not have the ability to upload photos for her along with this nomination, but if you want some, please get me your email address, and I will submit some. Thanks.

Jason Moore

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2013 NM Rifle Antelope Hunt

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Hey Everyone… Here is the video for my 2013 Rifle Antelope Hunt…

Good times… Thanks for watching..

 

Draining of Lake Roberts

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This should be a good thing..

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New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
Media contact: Dan Williams, (505) 476-8004
Public contact: (505) 476-8000
dan.williams@state.nm.us
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, JULY 30, 2013:
Lake Roberts dam improvement project to begin soon
SILVER CITY – A project to improve the dam and spillway at Lake Roberts, a popular fishing and camping destination in southwestern New Mexico, is scheduled to begin this week as the Department of Game and Fish starts to lower the water level about 10 feet.

The lake and the Gila National Forest campgrounds and picnic area will remain open during the construction, estimated to take about one year. Fishing opportunities and access to the shoreline may be limited, and the boat ramp will be closed as the water level drops over the next month. The portion of the lake around the dam and spillway will be closed for the duration of the project.

The Department of Game and Fish will monitor fish health during the project to determine whether to relax fishing bag limits to avoid fish going to waste. Once the project is finished, the lake will be refilled and restocked with fish.

The $6.5 million project is designed to make the dam and spillway better able to withstand extreme flooding events. The plan is to replace the existing spillway, construct a secondary 70-feet-wide spillway, and raise the dam eight feet. Sportsmen are paying for the project through license fees and federal excise taxes on fishing equipment and boat fuel.

Mike Gustin, assistant chief of lands for the Department of Game and Fish, said the state engineer has indicated that the dam could be vulnerable if a major flood were to come down Sapillo Creek. Since the dam was completed in 1963, a small town has taken roots along the tailwaters. The improvements will help the dam withstand a major flood.

The dam at Lake Roberts is one of 11 dams owned and maintained by the State Game Commission and the Department of Game and Fish. The others are Eagle Nest, Bear Canyon, Jackson, McGaffey, Laguna del Campo, Fenton, Hopewell, Snow, Quemado and Clayton lakes. All are scheduled for different degrees of upgrades over the next four years.

For more information about the Gila National Forest recreation sites at Lake Roberts, please contact Wilderness District Ranger Ray Torres at (575) 536-2250.

Trail Cam Pics.. What Survived…

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2 Blade Broadhead Review

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How about a quick 2 Blade Broadhead Review??

B’s Camo Cricket

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A few weeks ago Candace and I took Brock shooting. It went pretty well and he had a great time but we ran across a few issues

1) He was using a gun that was WAY to big for him

2) With the Marlin he was shooting it was hard to get him to “reset” once he fired his first shot.  In other words, with that little semi-auto he just went nuts and started spraying bullets.  Partially my fault.

3) We wanted for B to have a little gun of his own

4) We also wanted him to learn correct form

5) AND to be honest I was looking for a project

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That being said we put the word out on the street that we were in the market for a youth .22.  We went to the usual places and found a few but we figured that SOMEONE had to have one that they had outgrown… The good news is that some old dude at the range had one and sold it to us for $20.00. He really helped us out, I guess he looked at me and figured I was going to be the old dude hanging out at the range some day so he had pity on us.

Below is what the gun started liked and the progression from boring black to digital camo.

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I made a small paint booth out of an old box, it seems to work pretty well

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The key is to make sure that you don’t spray on the paint to heavily… TAKE YOUR TIME… Multiple coats are better than runny paint

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This is what B’s Cricket looks like… Pretty neat.

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This was a fun little project.  What lessons did I learn?

1) BUY STENCILS – We made our own and it was a pain in the butt.  It is well worth the $10 that you can get them for online.

2)Google Youtube – There are a ton of tips on painting your gun.

3) Just have fun, you can always paint it again.

 

MORE ACCESS!!!!

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This is good stuff…

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, JAN. 11, 2013:

Partnership will reopen road to 20,000 acres of public hunting land in Gila National Forest

SANTA FE – Hunters and other outdoor recreationists will regain vehicle access to more than 20,000 acres of public land through a road-building partnership between the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and the Gila National Forest.

The two agencies will split the cost to construct a 1.5-mile road to reroute Forest Road 886 and bypass a private mining claim in the Black Range of the Gila National Forest known as the Royal John Mine. Owners of the claim closed the road to the public about 10 years ago, denying hunters vehicle access to prime deer, elk and turkey country in Game Management Unit 24.

The new road is expected to be completed before the 2013-14 big-game hunting seasons.

Department funding for the project will come from Open Gate, a program funded by hunters and anglers through the purchase of Habitat Management and Access validations required with each hunting or fishing license. The program’s objective is to work with landowners and land-management agencies to provide access to more hunting, fishing and trapping opportunities on public and private lands.

The new road will give hunters and trappers access to remote lands that hold healthy populations of deer, elk, turkeys, bears, cougars, furbearers and a number of small-game species. It also will give the public a chance to enjoy other recreational opportunities such as hiking, horseback riding and camping.

“This project will resolve a long-standing issue for many of our public land users,” Silver City District Ranger Russell Ward said. “We are very proud to be able to partner with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. This project is a fantastic example of the“Open Gate program to improve access to National Forest lands by our public land users.”

For more information about the Open Gate program, please visit the department website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us, click on the hunting tab and select Open Gate.

Reloading Bug!!!

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Over the last few months I have been helping Candace work on shooting her muzzle-loader, part of that work included shooting our .223.  I just wanted her to get use to the the process of firing a gun and getting familiar with things.   At the time I had a quite a bit of Ammo that was Ready to Roll but I had even more brass sitting around that needed to be clean up, re-sized, primed, grained and loaded. To be honest I wasn’t sure if that brass was ever going to get the attention that it deserved, so it just sat in a bucket.   After the season, Candace and I realized that we had a pretty good time just going to the range and shooting a little, so a couple of nights ago Brock and I started working on getting that old brass load.  I am not sure he really understands what we are doing or the process but he is pretty good at little tasks… I think he is pretty good at this type of detail stuff because of all the lego’s he plays with…  Anyway, it is the same basic concept.

Here he is helping me get the media out of the brass….

Little Guys… Some Ready, Some in Staging..