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Another YEP Winner

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This is what it is all about… Great Job Emma, we are super proud of you…

J-

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I’d like to nominate my daughter – Emma Moore; she is 11 years old. She has been at my side fishing for trout but has often mentioned how she would really like to hunt. In February 2013, she took her hunter safety course and passed. On the way home, I asked her if she would like me to enter her into the draw. Instantly, her reply was, “yes!” I asked what she wanted to hunt. She replied elk with a bow. I told her that she was probably not big enough to kill an elk with a bow yet. She was disappointed. I asked her if there was anything else she wanted to hunt. She replied with put me in for everything.

Between the time of putting in for the draw and getting the results, we hunted turkey with our friends Carl and Robin (his daughter) Abrams. We got skunked. However, Emma got her own 20 gauge over/under so now, she is prepared for bird hunting.

When the draw was released, we were excited that Emma drew a once in a lifetime Oryx tag on the WSMR. She practiced all summer long with a Remington 700 Mountain Rifle, which I had customized for her length of pull. She went from shooting a reduced recoil load to the hottest load that I could find – Winchester 180 grain XP3. She not only handled the load well, but she also maintained her accuracy.

We joined Robin (her friend) on her antelope hunt and watched her take an antelope. This only fueled Emma’s fire for hunting. We went to WSMR in late September for her hunt. We hunted hard Friday (after the safety brief), Saturday, and Sunday. We jumped oryx and spotted and stalked oryx for 3 long days. That was one of the harder hunts that we have had on WSMR (Stallion). On Saturday, we spotted 4 oryx about 1.5 miles out. We decided to go after them. We stalked to within 40 yards of them. They were bedded in the brush. Turns out, there were 6 of them. We sat there for about 5 minutes quietly picking them through the brush and trying to show the children (Robin, Carl’s daughter was with us) where they were. I told Emma to pick one out, and when they stood, she would only have a second or so to shoot. Well, they stood, and Emma was so excited that the gun never barked once. Instead, I could see that Emma was almost shaking because she was so excited.

That night she told me that she blew it and was worried that she would not be able to get one. I was beginning to doubt myself about putting her in for a once in a lifetime tag. I told her that we would do our best the next day, but she needed to be prepared because you could go overs and days hunting, but sometimes you only have a second or so opportunity to pull it off. The next day, we went out again, and got into some Oryx. They were about 110 yards off, and the they spotted us and took off. Emma and I chased after them after they hit a hill. I was in the lead with her following me. When we were running towards them, a doe popped up out of no where and shocked both of us. The oryx were gone at that point, but we gave it a try.

We decided to go down to the southern part of Stallion around lunch time. The kids were getting hungry, and Carl and I decided to make some dehydrated food for them while we glassed for oryx. All of sudden, Carl pulled me to the side exclaiming that there were 3 typical horned oryx running our way. I pulled Emma out of the truck and got her set up in a prone position. They were at 220 yards – a stretch for her, but still doable. They came within range and were still running. Carl honked the truck horn, and they stopped. Still, the Remington did not bark. Emma was frustrated, and said that she had no shot (she was on an elevated position trying to shoot down from a prone position…for an adult, this was doable but not for an 11 year old). We hopped into the truck and sped down the road. The oryx were still running. We got about a mile ahead of them. Emma and I bailed out of the truck and ran about 300 yards out into the desert. We looked and looked but could not located them. I looked behind us thinking what in the heck…where did they go? Then, I spotted them running straight at us. I turned Emma around and pointed to them. I ranged them at 110 yards and told her that they were still running towards us. I told her to pick out any one of them that she wanted. She did. They stopped at 65 yards, and she shot at the lead cow. The cow oryx was quartering to us, and Emma hit that oryx hard. The oryx side stepped about 10 feet after the shot while I was telling (maybe even yelling???) shoot it again, shoot it again. Emma was so excited that she ejected the shell but jammed it when she put the bolt forward. She handed me the rifle, and I cleared the jam and gave her the rifle right when the oryx fell. I cannot explain to anyone the way I felt knowing that my 11 year old daughter just killed a typical oryx on a once in a lifetime hunt.

The cow was not huge – it was 31″, but when we got to the gate, we were told that we were one of the lucky ones. Out of the 65 (or so) tags for the hunt, there were only about half of the hunters who were successful with only half of those being able to take a typical. We were told that the cold winter from 3 years ago had hit the oryx herd hard, and that many of the survivors only had 1 horn due to the extreme cold temperatures. They told us that her oryx was definitely considered a trophy. Regardless of what they had told us, this oryx was a true trophy. This oryx also cemented the fact that now she wants to hunt regardless of being successful or anything else.

We went out to hunt cow elk with a muzzleloader (again, having one of mine customized for her). Again, we had no success, but she did get a muzzleloader out of it. To boot, she got a Diamond Infinity Edge bow for Christmas. She now has her own 20 gauge shotgun, a 30-06 rifle, a Knight .50 muzzleloader, and a bow. She is now all set for future hunts!!!

I do not have the ability to upload photos for her along with this nomination, but if you want some, please get me your email address, and I will submit some. Thanks.

Jason Moore

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Comments Off on Bass Fishing in Bill Evans and Trail Cam Pics

How about a little FF for Largemouth Bass in Bill Evans and some trail cam pics??

Day at the Roundhouse

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What an adventure and an eye opener…

Last week I spent some time at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe trying to get the word out on sportsman’s issues.  The big ones that I was/am concerned about is the Game and Fishes Budget and trapping.

Basically, they were going to be cut by 13% over a budget that has been flat since 2008. They are currently down 61 positions most of those are Game and Fish Officers…

The other issue I was concerned about was the Anti-trapping Bill.  I will stress that I am not a trapper but this was just a bad bill.  Trapping is a needed and under-appreciated management tool.

Overall, I think we will get what I/we want but it is just a drag that we need to fight so hard for something that is right and we will have to fight again next year.  The Anti-trapping contingent is well funded and will never stop trying to ban trapping.  SO PLEASE GET INVOLVED…

The other thing that I found interesting is that unless you have a lobbyist or full-time staff that works on these issues it is very hard to get into the game.  Persuading lawmakers is all about relationships, unless they know who you are and trust you, you are just another talking head.

After looking at some of these Senators desks it because pretty obvious that professional lobbyist are bringing our Senators food as gifts.  Next year I am think about bringing little baggies of deer or elk jerky..

 

 

Fire Potential for the New Year

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This is kind of boring but you might find it interesting..

Fire Potential

J-

MORE ACCESS!!!!

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This is good stuff…

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, JAN. 11, 2013:

Partnership will reopen road to 20,000 acres of public hunting land in Gila National Forest

SANTA FE – Hunters and other outdoor recreationists will regain vehicle access to more than 20,000 acres of public land through a road-building partnership between the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and the Gila National Forest.

The two agencies will split the cost to construct a 1.5-mile road to reroute Forest Road 886 and bypass a private mining claim in the Black Range of the Gila National Forest known as the Royal John Mine. Owners of the claim closed the road to the public about 10 years ago, denying hunters vehicle access to prime deer, elk and turkey country in Game Management Unit 24.

The new road is expected to be completed before the 2013-14 big-game hunting seasons.

Department funding for the project will come from Open Gate, a program funded by hunters and anglers through the purchase of Habitat Management and Access validations required with each hunting or fishing license. The program’s objective is to work with landowners and land-management agencies to provide access to more hunting, fishing and trapping opportunities on public and private lands.

The new road will give hunters and trappers access to remote lands that hold healthy populations of deer, elk, turkeys, bears, cougars, furbearers and a number of small-game species. It also will give the public a chance to enjoy other recreational opportunities such as hiking, horseback riding and camping.

“This project will resolve a long-standing issue for many of our public land users,” Silver City District Ranger Russell Ward said. “We are very proud to be able to partner with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. This project is a fantastic example of the“Open Gate program to improve access to National Forest lands by our public land users.”

For more information about the Open Gate program, please visit the department website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us, click on the hunting tab and select Open Gate.

Reloading Bug!!!

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Over the last few months I have been helping Candace work on shooting her muzzle-loader, part of that work included shooting our .223.  I just wanted her to get use to the the process of firing a gun and getting familiar with things.   At the time I had a quite a bit of Ammo that was Ready to Roll but I had even more brass sitting around that needed to be clean up, re-sized, primed, grained and loaded. To be honest I wasn’t sure if that brass was ever going to get the attention that it deserved, so it just sat in a bucket.   After the season, Candace and I realized that we had a pretty good time just going to the range and shooting a little, so a couple of nights ago Brock and I started working on getting that old brass load.  I am not sure he really understands what we are doing or the process but he is pretty good at little tasks… I think he is pretty good at this type of detail stuff because of all the lego’s he plays with…  Anyway, it is the same basic concept.

Here he is helping me get the media out of the brass….

Little Guys… Some Ready, Some in Staging..

Comments Off on Game and Fish Press Release – Online Meeting and Jive Turkeys

Two things that are important in this meeting…
1) You can view the meeting online
2) There is a proposal for hunters to report turkey harvest.

J-

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ANTELOPE HUNTING, CARCASS TAG ELIMINATION ON GAME COMMISSION AGENDA
RATON – Proposed changes to the way the Department of Game and Fish distributes pronghorn antelope licenses and a proposal to eliminate carcass tags for harvested game are among agenda items before the State Game Commission at its meeting Thursday in Raton.

The Department has revised its proposal to the Pronghorn Antelope Rule and now recommends retaining the existing license-distribution system. Earlier proposals stemmed from ongoing efforts to simplify the system for hunters and private landowners. The Department received many comments by mail, e-mail and at several public meetings about the proposals, which would have established hunt dates, areas and management strategies similar to the way the Department manages deer hunting. Under the proposals, private-land licenses would have been available over-the-counter instead of through annual drawings, and hunters would negotiate with landowners for access to private property.

The Department proposed three options: retaining the existing pronghorn licensing system with no changes; switching to over-the-counter private-land licensing in southwestern, southeastern and northwestern New Mexico; or switching to over-the-counter private-land licensing only in southeastern New Mexico.

The Commission meeting will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 1 in the Colfax County Commission Chambers, 230 North 3rd St., in Raton. Detailed agenda-item briefings and other information are available on the Department of Game and Fish website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us, or by calling (505) 476-8008. Details of proposed rules and opportunities to comment are available on the website.

Other agenda items include:

A proposal to eliminate the requirement for big-game and turkey carcass tags, and to require all hunters and anglers to obtain customer identification numbers in a move to facilitate the Department’s transition to a web-based “paperless” licensing system in April 2013.
A proposal to require all big-game and turkey hunters to report their harvests each year starting in April 2013 to be eligible to apply for or purchase licenses the following year.
A proposal to allow youths to hunt with firearms before completing a hunter education course, provided they hunt with a licensed adult mentor and complete a hunter education course within two years.
A proposal to acquire more property in southeastern New Mexico to be managed as habitat for lesser prairie chickens.
A proposal to accept the Department’s biennial review of state-listed threatened and endangered species, which recommends no changes to the existing lists.

State Game Commission meetings are broadcast live over the Internet and can be accessed from Gov. Susana Martinez’s website, http://www.governor.state.nm.us/Webcast.aspx. Information about how to view the streaming video is available on the website.

The State Game Commission is composed of seven members who represent the state’s diverse interests in wildlife-associated recreation and conservation. Members are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the state Senate. Current members are Chairman Jim McClintic, Vice-chairman Thomas “Dick” Salopek, Tom Arvas, Bill Montoya, Scott Bidegain, Paul M. Kienzle and Robert Espinoza Sr.

If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the meeting, please contact Sonya Quintana, (505) 476-8030. Public documents, including the agenda and minutes, can be provided in various accessible forms.

Early Season Archery Coues Deer Success

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I was very fortunate to take this great buck.

 

Gila River Festival – Short Film

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I was asked to be part of a project for the Gila River Festival… I think it came out pretty well…

The Gila River: It Makes Life Good from Allyson Siwik on Vimeo.

Comments Off on Hail, Turkeys(footage) and Trail Cam Pics

Hey Everybody…

How about a little video…

I have to admit these turkeys are UGLY…